Karen Adelson - Barrett Sotheby's International Realty


A seller's market provides many opportunities for those who plan to list a residence in the near future. If you know how to capitalize on a seller's market, you may be able to quickly and effortlessly sell your house and maximize your property sale earnings.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you get the most out of a seller's market.

1. Analyze Your Home's Strengths and Weaknesses

It may be beneficial to conduct an inspection prior to adding your house to a seller's market. With an inspection report in hand, you can assess your residence's strengths and weaknesses. Then, you can perform home repairs and upgrades and boost the likelihood of getting the best price for your residence.

In addition, you may want to complete a home appraisal. If you receive an appraisal report, you can analyze a property valuation and use this information to establish an aggressive initial asking price for your house.

2. Craft an Engaging Home Listing

A home listing typically plays a pivotal role in the house selling journey. If you devote time and resources to create an engaging home listing, you should have no trouble stirring up lots of interest in your home in a seller's market.

As you craft a home listing, it may be a good idea to evaluate the buyer's perspective. If you understand what separates your home from comparable residences in your city or town, you may be able to find innovative ways to differentiate your house listing from all others.

It often helps to include high-resolution images of your home in your listing too. You also should incorporate accurate details about your home into your listing to help buyers determine if your residence matches or exceeds their expectations.

3. Work with a Real Estate Agent

Selling a home sometimes is tricky, regardless of the current housing market's conditions. Lucky for you, real estate agents are available who can help you achieve the optimal results in a seller's market.

A real estate agent knows what it takes to sell a residence in any location, at any time. First, he or she will create a personalized home selling strategy designed to help you accomplish your desired goals. A real estate agent next will put this plan into action and promote your residence to potential buyers. If you receive an offer to purchase your house, a real estate agent will help you determine whether to accept, reject or counter this proposal.

Furthermore, a real estate agent will help you finalize a home sale. He or she will offer tips and recommendations to help you prepare for a home closing and respond to any of your concerns or questions. Plus, a real estate agent will keep in touch with you as your home closing date approaches to help you alleviate stress.

There are lots of things you can do to capitalize on a seller's market. Thanks to the aforementioned tips, you can take advantage of a seller's market and seamlessly navigate the home selling journey.


As a home seller, receiving the first offer on your residence can be an exciting experience. However, the initial offer on your home may prove to be insufficient for a number of reasons, including:

1. The offer fails to meet your expectations.

Ideally, a home seller will allocate the necessary time and resources to fully analyze a house before adding it to the real estate market. This will enable a home seller to establish realistic expectations for his or her house and price it accordingly.

Conducting a home appraisal offers a great starting point for a home seller to determine the true value of a residence. This appraisal ensures a home inspector will examine a residence's interior and exterior. Then, the inspector will provide a report that details a house's strengths and weaknesses.

With a home appraisal report in hand, a home seller should have no trouble establishing a "fair" price for his or her residence. And if an initial offer falls short of this price, a home seller can politely decline the proposal and wait for additional offers.

2. The homebuyer has submitted a "lowball" proposal.

In some instances, a homebuyer may submit a "lowball" offer in the hopes of acquiring a terrific house at a budget-friendly price. If a home seller cannot differentiate between a reasonable offer and a lowball proposal, he or she risks missing out on an opportunity to optimize the value of a residence.

An informed home seller should examine the prices of available houses that are similar to his or her own. By doing so, this property seller can see how his or her residence stacks up against the competition and map out the home selling journey accordingly.

Moreover, an informed home seller will mow the front lawn, trim the hedges and do whatever it takes to enhance a house's curb appeal. This home seller likely understands the importance of making a positive first impression on homebuyers, and as a result, will perform assorted home exterior improvements to help reduce the risk of receiving a lowball initial offer.

3. The offer does not correspond to the current state of the housing market.

For a home seller, it is essential to work with a real estate agent who can provide full details about the current state of the housing market.

A real estate agent can help a home seller differentiate between a buyer's market and a seller's market. Plus, this housing market professional can provide honest, unbiased recommendations about whether a home seller should decline an initial offer on a home.

Many real estate agents are available in cities and towns nationwide, and these housing market experts are happy to help home sellers in any way they can. If you employ a real estate agent before you list your home, you can reap the benefits of unparalleled guidance at each stage of the home selling journey.

There is no reason to settle for a subpar initial offer on your residence. Instead, consider a first offer closely, and you can make an informed decision about whether to decline or accept it.


For those who want to sell a house, it helps to plan ahead as much as possible. By doing so, you can identify potential home selling hurdles and address such problems.

To better understand how to prepare for the house selling journey, let's take a look at three questions that every home seller needs to consider before listing a residence.

1. What is my home worth?

What you originally paid for your house likely is very different from your home's current value. Fortunately, a home appraisal makes it simple to receive an accurate property valuation based on the current condition of your residence and various real estate market factors.

A home appraisal report generally can be prepared in just days. To obtain this report, a home seller will need to hire a property appraiser to analyze his or her residence. Also, a property appraiser will evaluate the current state of the real estate market, the prices of comparable residences that recently sold and other relevant housing market data.

Once you receive a home appraisal report, you can establish a competitive initial asking price for your residence. And with this price in place, you may be able to speed up the home selling journey.

2. Is my home an attractive option?

Think about what sets your house apart from others – you'll be happy you did. Because if you can differentiate your residence from the competition, you may be able to stir up lots of interest in your house as soon as it becomes available.

Oftentimes, it is beneficial to conduct a house inspection prior to listing a home. An inspection enables you to identify any underlying problems with your home. You then can prioritize and complete home repairs based on the inspection results.

You may want to allocate time and resources to bolster your house's curb appeal too. Remember, your home only gets one chance to make a great first impression on prospective buyers. If you enhance your residence's curb appeal, you can boost the likelihood that potential buyers will immediately fall in love with your home.

3. How can I maximize the value of my house?

There is no one-size-fits-all solution to promote a house to buyers. Lucky for you, real estate agents are available who can help you craft a custom home selling strategy.

A real estate agent is a home selling professional who understands what it takes to promote a house to the right groups of buyers. He or she will work with you throughout the home selling journey and do everything possible to ensure you can optimize the value of your house.

Best of all, a real estate agent is an expert home selling resource. And if you ever have concerns or questions as you sell your house, a real estate agent can respond to them at any time.

Want to streamline the home selling process? Hire a real estate agent today, and you can move one step closer to listing and selling your house.


Receiving multiple offers on a residence is a home seller's dream come true. However, if a home seller faces a tight deadline to review several homebuying proposals simultaneously, making the right decision may prove to be exceedingly difficult.

Ultimately, evaluating multiple home offers at the same time can be quick and seamless – here are three tips to ensure that you can review various home offers and make an informed decision.

1. Consider the Homebuyer's Perspective

Although you probably won't be able to find out the identity of a homebuyer who submits an offer on your home, you may be able to learn about the homebuyer's perspective if you study a home offer closely.

For example, a homebuyer who wants to close on a residence as soon as possible may face a time crunch. And if this buyer has fallen in love with your home, he or she may do anything possible to acquire it.

On the other hand, a homebuyer who submits a lowball proposal may be looking for a bargain. Therefore, this home offer may fall far below your initial expectations, and you should not hesitate to decline or counter the proposal.

2. Analyze the Housing Market

Operating in a buyer's market or a seller's market may dictate how you proceed with multiple offers on your house.

If you've listed a house in a seller's market, the number of homebuyers likely exceeds the number of first-rate houses that are available. As such, you may want to accept a home offer in a seller's market only if it matches or exceeds your expectations.

Comparatively, if you're working in a buyer's market, there likely is an abundance of high-quality residences and a shortage of homebuyers. Thus, you may be more inclined to accept a home offer that nets you the biggest profit – even if the home offer falls shy of your initial home selling expectations.

3. Collaborate with a Real Estate Agent

If you're unsure about how to approach multiple offers on your home, it certainly pays to consult with a real estate agent. In fact, a real estate agent can help you examine various offers and decide which home offer – if any – is right for you.

By hiring a real estate agent, you'll gain an expert ally who will support you throughout the home selling journey.

Typically, a real estate agent will learn about your home selling goals and ensure you can set a competitive price for your residence. He or she also will host home showings and open houses, negotiate with homebuyers on your behalf and do everything possible to help you get the best price for your home, regardless of the real estate market's conditions.

Perhaps best of all, a real estate agent is prepared to respond to your home selling concerns and queries. And if you have questions about a home offer, your real estate agent is available to respond to your questions at any time.

Take the guesswork out of evaluating multiple offers on your home – use the aforementioned tips, and you can determine the best course of action based on the home offers at your disposal.



 Photo by bidvine via Pixabay

Some home projects and improvements can't wait - a leaking hot water heater or a water damaged floor need to be replaced right away. Other, planned renovations and upgrades are optional. Consider not only your current needs, but the potential impact of any large planned upgrade on your home's value before you proceed. If you are upgrading your home to sell it soon, the improvements you make should add value to your home and be recouped when you are ready to sell. 

4 Home Improvements that Add the Most Value to your Home (and 3 That Don't)

Some upgrades enhance the overall value of your home, while others allow you to improve the look of your home, and recover the majority of your costs when you sell. According to Bankrate.com, the best places to invest your upgrade dollars include: 

A new garage door: It may not be fancy or a feature you notice, but replacing a sagging, out of date or ailing garage door with a newer, more secure model is a money savvy upgrade. The average garage upgrade costs about $3,600 -- and adds about $3,500 to the selling price of the home, making this a renovation that (almost) pays for itself. 

Kitchen Update: Bringing a dated or worn kitchen up to current day standards -- a makeover that usually costs about $22,000 for the average home -- can improve the selling price of your home by thousands of dollars. The average kitchen update boosts the value of a home by up to $18,000.

Enhance your yard with a deck: According to the Balance, adding a deck in your backyard expands your living space and allows you to add value to your home. The average cost of a wood deck is $10,000 -- and that deck adds an average of $9000 to your home's value, making it easy to add space without a huge investment. 

Replace siding: The curb appeal of your home has a significant impact on your ability to sell it and on the price you receive. According to the Balance, replacing aging siding with a similar quality new version allows you to recover about 75% of your investment. It will also make your home more appealing to buyers. 

Projects that Don't Add Value to your Home

You should not take on these projects if you truly want to enjoy the results for a while, as they won't have much of an impact on the selling price or value of your home. Some, like swimming pools, can even scare away buyers that would otherwise be interested in your property. According to the Balance, the worst home upgrades include swimming pools of all types, interior painting (because buyers may prefer different colors) and whole roof replacement (except in emergencies).